The Full Corn Moon September 2nd 2020

The Full Corn Moon 2020 …..

….. falls on 2nd September. And if you’re anything like me you’ll be thinking thank goodness it’s September.

I’m sure you’ve all noticed the days getting shorter and the nights getting cooler as the wheels spins us rapidly towards the dark half of the year.  That is why right now, I can be found in the back garden, on a clear night, on the very last day of August, enjoying one of the few nights left this summer where it is practical to sit outside and write.

It is very much in my nature to be outside whatever the weather; waterproof Gazebos and sheltered fire pits are my friends. However even I won’t sit and shiver my way through writing a blog post in the very coldest and darkest of days. 

I relish the crackling of the fires, the lights adorning houses and gardens, the celebrations of All Hallows Eve, Bonfire Night and Yule.  My dark goddesses come into their own and remind me in furtive whispers of the lessons they have taught me and make their promises that they will  continue to walk with me just as I promise to continue honouring them.

But let’s leave these tales of darkness here for now; we will continue talking about this in my upcoming Mabon blog post.  For now, we turn our attention to our beautiful lady of the sky in all of her bright and full glory.

www.linktr.ee/joncarraherart & @joncarraherart

The ceaseless and unforgiving spin of the wheel is the reason our September full moon is either named The Full Corn Moon or The Harvest Moon.  The Harvest Moon falls in September two in every three years, and is always the full moon closest to the Autumnal Equinox.  This year, in 2020, it is the full moon on 1st October which is closest to the Autumnal Equinox, making our September Full Moon the Full Corn Moon instead of the Harvest Moon. This happens every third year.

This year the Autumnal Equinox falls on 22nd September at 14.30 in the UK.

Our ancient ancestors tracked their time and seasons using the night sky; both the stars and the moon, and they named the monthly full moons to guide them through the practical activities they relied upon, such the dawning of the time of year to harvest their crops, and on what they saw in the natural world around them (for example the Sturgeon Moon or the Buck Moon are named after significant activities of these animals at particular points in the year).

This is the time of year to harvest and fill up on stores to last through the harsh winter months. Our ancestors saw more brutal and unforgiving winters than we do. They did not have the home luxuries that we have such as central heating to keep them warm and safe against the frosts. They did no have shops to provide them with all of their needs. Instead communities relied upon not only successful harvests of grains, fruits and vegetables to last them many months, but on gathering wood for fires and straw for roofs. The coming of the Corn Moon (or Harvest Moon) was an important marker, a vital indicator of this notch on the spinning wheel.

Harvesting apples is a practice as old as the memories of witches. Beautiful image by @fraukruber

And whilst the coming days and months are filled with preparations for winter, it is also delightfully true that the days leading to winter are days for the warmth of flames, cosy blankets and heart warming tales; these are my favourite times of the year.  Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy the changing seasons and find joy in the Spring and Summer, walking with the May Queen and Oak King along their path of virility to their place of slumber, however the darker days are my domain.

Civilisations across the globe have had many names for the full moons, and, through the ages, the name The Full Corn Moon has been generally accepted as the name for this particular September Moon, with alternatives being The Barley Moon, the Fruit Moon and the Honey Moon. The name comes to us from wise tribes of Native Americans, who recognised many moos ago that this was the time of year to begin thinking about harvesting the crops, bringing in the grains, and making stores for the colder months ahead.  This year our Full Corn Moon is the last full moon of the summer, a reminder to us that colder days are close on our tails.

This image by @garlandsandgravestones depict this full moon perfectly. Visit them at www.linktr.ee/garlandsandgravestones

As we journey into the coming annual darkness we find ourselves with more time to reflect and to complete the thoughts of where we want our path to lead us though the next few months and of the things we would like to bring into our lives. These many faceted thoughts that come to us in fragments through the excitements and adventures of the long summer days never seem to feel fully formed.  The Full Corn Moon is the perfect time to sit with these thoughts and allow them to complete their transformation into plans and goals. 

During the Full Corn Moon, when you’re sitting with these thoughts, focus on your emotions, on healing your body and mind, on bringing balance into your life. These are the areas that will reap the most benefit from soaking in the moonbeams, whether real if you’re outside or metaphorical if you’re inside, of the homely and generous Full Corn Moon.

This Full Corn Moon with help you to see those around you and inside of yourself clearly. Stunning image by @syri_water & www.syriwater.etsy.com

Don’t forget that all full moons are of course magical times to recharge healing crystals, to make moon water, to cast spells and set manifestations for abundance and healing. Just remember that it is during the Full Corn Moon, when the focus of the natural cycles of our Mother Earth is to harvest, to store, to bring into life and home the things needed to survive the coming winter, that that your wishes and intentions for abundance are in perfect symmetry with the flow of the year and are particularly strong.

Stay Wild & Blessed Be

Ginger Witch

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